Climate responses in the absence of humans

To celebrate International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month the Museum is sharing the stories of 27 inspirational women, alongside the animals they work with the most. Dr Michela Leonardi Department of Zoology “If we want to improve conservation strategies in the face of the current climate emergency, we need to understand how climate influences animal  distribution in the absence of human activity. This is … Continue reading Climate responses in the absence of humans

Rhino

Exploring gender in conservation

To celebrate International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month the Museum is sharing the stories of 27 inspirational women, alongside the animals they work with the most. Fleur Nash Department of Geography “For me, when I think of animals, I can’t separate them from humans. That is why I am researching conservation and how humans, in the form of international non-governmental organisations (INGOs), work within … Continue reading Exploring gender in conservation

Coral reef. Credit S Steele

Our Changing Reef Habitats

Just beneath the waves in shallow tropical seas you’ll find a world teeming with life. It’s here that we find coral reefs – colourful habitats where countless creatures live. This Nature Classroom will explore these fascinating ecosystems and how they are being affected by climate change. First we will uncover what corals are, then make a coral reef spinner to explore coral bleaching. We’ll then … Continue reading Our Changing Reef Habitats

Eudyptula minor, University Museum of Zoology collection, copyright University of Cambridge

Protecting penguins

To celebrate International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month the Museum is sharing the stories of 27 inspirational women, alongside the animals they work with the most. Dr Antje Steinfurth RSPB, Centre for Conservation Science “Penguins are one of the most iconic groups of animals, but over half of the world’s penguin species are under threat of extinction. My research has focused on understanding the … Continue reading Protecting penguins

Ana Carneiro looking at albatross

Tracking albatrosses

To celebrate International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month the Museum is sharing the stories of 27 inspirational women, alongside the animals they work with the most. Dr Ana Carneiro and Lizzie Pearmain BirdLife International “The population of wandering albatrosses at South Georgia has declined catastrophically since the 1960s. The major cause of their decline is the birds getting caught on or colliding with fishing … Continue reading Tracking albatrosses

Dragonfly (BEFTA). Credit Ed Turner

A diversity of dragonflies in oil palm plantations

Sarah Luke Museum of Zoology, Insect Ecology Group New research from the Museum of Zoology and collaborators finds a diverse and variable dragonfly community in oil palm plantations in Sumatra, Indonesia. Across the globe, large areas of naturally forested habitats have been converted to agriculture to feed a growing world population. This conversion usually results in dramatic changes in the habitat, including losses of habitat … Continue reading A diversity of dragonflies in oil palm plantations

Climate Change: the board game

You are an animal species, living in the savannah. The world is divided in four habitats based on the average temperature and precipitation (rain and snowfall) in each area. There are hotter and colder regions around you, but you find the average temperature of the savannah very comfortable. The savannah is occupied by a number of different species (the other players), all adapted to this … Continue reading Climate Change: the board game

Lesser redpolls University Museum of Zoology collection ©University of Cambridge

Understanding bird populations in a changing world

To celebrate International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month the Museum is sharing the stories of 27 inspirational women, alongside the animals they work with the most. Eleanor Miller Department of Zoology “We live in an era of significant environmental and climatic change. To understand how species might cope with different climates in the future, it is important to explore how they responded to rapid … Continue reading Understanding bird populations in a changing world

Hedgehog on grass

Become a Helpful Hedgehog Hero

You can provide a safe space for British wildlife right in your garden or local green space. This is especially useful for creatures, including hedgehogs, if you live in an urban environment and can make a real difference to their survival. These unique prickly mammals are a favourite amongst the UK public (especially our ‘over-stuffed’ Museum specimen who has seen leaner days) and if we … Continue reading Become a Helpful Hedgehog Hero

Komodo Island illustration

Here be Dragons!

Explore the real-life world of dragons… Tom Jameson, PhD student says, Dragons do not only populate the myths and legends of the past, but also the world around us. Komodo dragons, Varanus komodoensis, are the world’s largest lizards, so named for reminding early explorers of the beasts of legend. Life as a Komodo dragon Komodo dragon’s skin is rough and durable like other large lizards, … Continue reading Here be Dragons!

Coral reef - credit S Steele

Glacial past, genetic science and saving today’s coral reefs

To celebrate International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month the Museum is sharing the stories of 27 inspirational women, alongside the animals they work with the most. Maddie Emms Department of Zoology “I am a Zoology PhD student interested in how environmental change affects coral reef organisms. Coral reefs are incredibly important habitats but are sensitive to environmental change. I am studying how the loss … Continue reading Glacial past, genetic science and saving today’s coral reefs

Hover Fly On Poppy Head - credit Kate Howlett

Insects are animals too: why perceptions matter

Kate Howlett, NERC-funded PhD student says, Thank you to everyone who got involved in our little experiment last week to find out who we think of as the Easter bunny. Whilst questions like this which ask about our perception of animal species are often just a bit of fun, they are also important in building up a larger picture about our relationship with the natural … Continue reading Insects are animals too: why perceptions matter